Bridging Buddhism and Enochian, Part 6: Considering the Pure Lands

Before I get into my analysis of the Pure Lands, let me note how this is related to Enochian in my mind. Mainly, the concept of Pure Lands remind me of the Enochian word pibliar, which means “places of comfort.” Pibliar itself is striking to me, for why have such a different word for heaven, unless it is not about heaven? Pibliar appears in the seventh spoken Enochian call, the translation of which is quite lovely:

“The east is a house of virgins singing praises amongst the flames of the First Glory; wherein the Lord hath opened His Mouth, and they become 28 living dwellings in whom the strength of men rejoiceth and they are appareled with ornaments of brightness such as work wonders on all creatures. Whose kingdoms and continuance are as the Third and Fourth; strong towers and places of comfort, the seats of mercy and continuance. O you servants of mercy, move, appear, sing praises unto the Creator, and be mighty amongst us. For to this remembrance is given power and our strength waxeth strong in our Comforter.”

I’ll digress to note the here the astrological, kabbalistic, and numerological implications: there’s a clear reference to the 28 lunar mansions (“28 living dwellings…appareled with ornaments of brightness [stars]”), and the implication of the moon (“waxeth”). The ordering of the dyads would suggest that the Third or the number 3 relates to strong towers, a seat of mercy, while the Fourth or the number 4 suggests places of comfort and a seat of continuance–but a clear reading of the text suggests a switch of significations, which should instead be as follows: 3, strong towers, a seat of continuance; and 4, places of comfort, seat of mercy. This corresponds well with 3 as Binah/Understanding and 4/Chesed/Mercy.

As I mentioned: I digress. To the analysis: in Buddhism, pure lands or buddha-fields are reminiscent of an actual location or place. Indeed, the Buddha Amitabha’s pure land of Sukhavati is described as millions of Buddha lands to the west, whereas other Buddhas’ pure lands also have directions: Aksobhya’s pure land of Abhirati to the east, Ratnasambhava’s pure land of Srimat to the south, and Amoghasiddhi’s pure land of Karmaprasiddhi/Prakuta of the north. Vairocana hosts Akanistha-Ghanavyuha. Note that “millions of Buddha lands to the west” (I’ve read in some sources “west of earth”) suggests a continuum of what is extruded out–presumably from Earth–and that this itself is reminiscent of both the celestial sphere of astrology, but also the Sambhogakaya or “body of enjoyment.”

Thus, we have the Earth (or other physical worlds) as the place of the actual bodies of Buddhas, or Nirmanakayas, the extrusion or reflection of these into Sambhogakayas and perhaps a similar extrusion of pure lands (which resemble metaphorical “fixed stars” mentioned by my friend Cody P.), and finally a Dharmakaya, which is an inconceivable aspect of being a Buddha. This makes the physical world very important, for we have a means of experiencing or even integrating all pure lands at once. To that end, as practitioners, it may be worthwhile to not only attempt to travel or project astrally to a pure land, but also to consider using the technique (from what I loosely “Hermetic Kabbalah”) of pathworking (i.e., finding paths from one Pure Land to another). The latter will likely help the seeker discover more about their own particular set of “fixed stars” which could guide and inform the particular Sambhogakaya they can develop.

Relating the Dharmakaya to Enochian, it reminds me of the phrase from Hermeticism (specifically Book of the 24 Philosophers) which I found referenced here: “God is an infinite sphere, the center of which is everywhere, the circumference nowhere.” To that I’ll add that for me, the Divine must also have the Buddha nature.

Bridging Buddhism & Enochian, Part 3: Applying Western Pathworking Concepts to Pure Land Buddhism.

In studying the Buddhist pure lands, it occurred to me that the Diamond Realm, which contains five such lands, contains a mapping of elements to directions, much as Enochian is mapped onto directions by elements. The associations are different: Enochian has fire-east, air-south, water-west, earth-north, while Mahayana and Vajrayana Buddhism have fire-west, air-north, water-east, earth-south–a 180-degree rotation.

Enochian’s Watchtower tablets have been largely interpreted in a framework provided by the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, which is to say, the four elemental tablets are considered to be further divided into sub-angles. Thus, for the fire tablet, one is left with angels derived from “fire of fire,” “air of fire,” “earth of fire” and “water of fire.” Applying this approach to the Pure Lands of Buddhism, one could create a network of paths between each. One could traverse northeast from Amitabha Buddha‘s western pure land of Sukhavati via a path located in the northwest of the Diamond Realm to reach Amoghasiddhi’s northern pure land of Karmaprasiddhi/Prakuṭā. Furthermore, considering this realm in three-dimensional space, it’s possible to have direct east-west and north-south routes which do not pass through Vairocana’s central pure land of Akaniṣṭha-Ghanavyūha.

What of other pure lands, such as Vaidūryanirbhāsa (“Pure Lapis Lazuli”) of the Buddha Bhaisajyaguru, located in the east? It’s possible to, of course, have a land to the east of the Diamond Realm itself, or above or below (or even in superposition with) the eastern Diamond Realm pure land of Abhirati. The nature of a path connecting these two is unclear, though it’s noteworthy that the eastern nature of both pure lands indicate some form of escape from sickness (via healing of body and mind from the teachings of Bhaisajyaguru and presumably at least as much in His Pure Land, and via sickness not existing at all in Abhirati). Regardless, there are other pure lands which do not appear to be so elemental in nature, and paths connecting these each other would also need to be discovered.

The linking via paths could also presumably be used to understand additional bases for potential pure lands. Further, the qualities related to the pure lands (such as those of the Diamond Realm) could be a means to travel from one to another. For example, the perception of mental formation could be the Western part of the Northern pure land of Karmaprasiddhi/Prakuṭā (link is in Spanish), while the mental formations of perception could be the Northern part of the Western pure land of Sukhavati.

Presumably; one could traverse from one pure land to another during meditation the same way one gets to Carnegie Hall. But such paths must, of course, be verified to exist via actual pathworking.

Bridging Enochian & Buddhism, Part 1

I’ve posted earlier that I believe Enochian can be used in conjunction, or perhaps even as a bridge to, Buddhism. This is a tricky idea that I’m not entirely ready to elaborate on yet, but I wanted to post about some of the visionary work I did in hypnagogia tonight.

The background is a health concern that isn’t yet over, as well as wondering about the spiritual progress I’ve made since finishing my first Excel version of Liber Loagaeth (note: I’ve also been exploring Buddhist mantras to Vajrakilaya, Padmasambhava, Yeshe Tsogyal, Mandarava, Amitabha, and Vairocana). As I was thinking about this, I tried to explore the culmination of gebofal, Day 49. I induced the energetic memory of that day, recalling the isomorphic divinity I felt with the universe.

It occurred to me that this isomorphic divinity must overlap with that of the aforementioned Buddhas (and yidam) must be included in this, and so I picked up on Padmasambhava’s energy and noted a line of sight which he was looking at. I noted that Yeshe Tsogyal was looking there, too, as were the others. I tried to use their gaze to see the common point, then saw a brilliant light and approached it. Interestingly, as soon as I began doing so, an interesting jeweled being, somewhat mechanical in look with four golden arms resembling a spider’s legs and a beautiful golden oval thorax with a gem taking up more than half its size in the middle, emerged from this light. It wasn’t hostile, yet at the same time, it seemed to be blocking me.

I did a gentle twist in midair and evaded the being, and went into this light. It was soft, and I was reminded of an admonishment I’d read online very recently from a Tibetan Buddhist teacher about avoiding the soft light and instead trying to find the dazzling light. Doing so, I passed through into a space in which all of reality seemed to buzz in and out of infinite heartspace. This, it seemed, was the clear light mind—not merely data emerging from an infinite possibility, but an infinite multiplex cord of all hearts, humming.

Here was the view of all of reality, seething and reckoning with its many possibilities, in anguish. Here the heart had to reckon with itself in its infinite varieties, and it was too much to be clear, and so it hurt.

I saw myself open my own heart to it all, an infinite gesture of compassion, and I found the view toward it all that I’d been aching for.

And now there are lifetimes more to express it.