A solution to Loagaeth, Part 8: A quick example of working with Liber Loagaeth: Leaf 9a

I’ve given several parts to the exploration of this mystical book, but I thought it would be best to try to show how some parts of this might look. For this, I’m using the scan from Phergoph’s blog for Leaf 9a, “Pagesgem.”

Row 1 shows a typical row, minus seven digits at the beginning and seven at the end (not shown):

Leaf 9a, row 1

Were I to venture a guess, I would parse this as: SED NACH AN ZACLAN ZAB ULACH OD AN GAH ZUCHA.

Some of this we have translations for; “OD” means “and” (I take my translations from Leitch’s The Angelical Language, Vol. 2) “Gah” means “spirits,” and “An” is one of the angelic Sons of Sons of Light, assigned to Jupiter if the order of activation holds, but potentially to Mercury or Hermes Trismegistus given the green tablet he held: SED NACH the angel An ZACLAN ZAB ULACH and the angel An, spirits ZUCHA. Unfortunately, there isn’t much else to go on. ULACH seems to have the root word UL, which is a noun meaning “end,” so one could speculate that this is a verb form of “to end.” ZACAR is an imperative form of the verb “to move,” so one could speculate ZACLAN is a different conjugation of “to move”; “LANG” means “those [angels] who serve,” whole “LANSH” means “exalted power,” suggesting LAN- means “exalting service,” so “ZACLAN” could mean “moving in service of.” Using these, one could interpolate some meaning: “SED NACH the angel An moves in service ZAB in order to end spirits ZUCHA.” A bit clearer, but still ultimately speculative.

You see the difficulty here. What about applying some of the techniques we’ve seen? Consider row 30 from Leaf 11a, “Ozimba Londorh” (the title itself suggestive of “Londoh,” meaning “kingdoms”):

Leaf 11a, Row 30, Part 1
Leaf 11a, Row 30, Part 2

I could parse this row as follows (I’ve italicized the larger lowercase letters): GE O GRAPH AN ALGED GEMNA VEDRAD OTHAL DAH GE HUD AXLO GEDNOG.

This seems worse, until you begin substituting the actual letter the spelled out letters (for example, in English, the letter B would be spelled out B-E-E, C would be C-E-E, and D would be, heh, spelled D-E-E). Enochian sometimes spells letters contrary to their pronunciation, so while Ged is the English letter G, Graph is the letter E. Here we can obtain:

GE O, E AN ALG GEMNA VEDRAD OTHAL DAH GE HUD AXLO GNOG.

“GE” means “not” and “O” means five. “DAH” may be equivalent to “DA,” which means “there.” So, we can begin a translation with:

“Not five”–possibly referring to the remaining five Sons of Sons of Light–“Not five, the angels E [and] An ALG GEMNA VEDRAD OTHAL there, not HUDAX LO GNOG.” “GNOG” may seem like an unlikely Enochian word, but there are a few which do begin with the letter G (actually Ged) followed by a consonant. Still, not enough to obtain much meaning. Let’s turn back to a third excerpt, this time again from Leaf 9a, but Row 25 (before & after the circle)

Leaf 9a, Row 25, before the circle.
Leaf 9a, Row 25, after the circle

ALGED NOPAL GETA–NOCH AN ALDAPH NA.

Substituting: “ALG NOX GETA–NOCH AN ALDAPH NA”; translating to the extent I can and including some speculation (“noco” means “servant” or “minister”): “ALG, [a] ministering angel out of Him–a ministering angel, the angel An, a gathering angel [of] The Lord.” Here we get a repeat of one of the words we’ve already seen: ALG, associating once again with the angel An.

This is merely applying one technique. Supposing that some transposition should be used, then ALG could mean AGL–“no,” “no one,” or “none”: “No [mere] ministering angel out of Him, [but] the ministering and gathering angel, An, of The Lord.” Yet it could instead mean the more straightforward “one within none,” a potential, realized as this angel An. Or “The one [come out] of nothing, a ministering angel out of Him, the ministering angel An, the ministering angel An, the gathering angel of The Lord.” In this interpretation, the transposition is a signature of Loagaeth across different lines of the text. There are hundreds of these seeming transpositions, insertions, and apparent substitutions, none of which seem to render the strings of an individual row completely meaningless, but rather to multiple forms of interpretation–“multiplied and dignified,” one could say. Still, for now, these remain somewhat incomplete (“fallen” from a complete translation) unless a key, or series of keys, is discovered.

I’ve previously alluded to potential paths to such a key, but for now I continue to manually copy Liber Loagaeth. I prefer getting this done to jumping toward a solution. Still, I wish to leave these potential clues for others who may be further ahead in their journey.

A Solution to Liber Loagaeth, Part 7

So I got to the “Pagesgem” half-leaf (9a) a few days ago. Aside from it being beautiful and the only table to both have numbers and a name, Bornogo, from the Heptarchy (four times in a beautiful cross-and-X pattern), and being the only table to have a large circle of diameter 21 within the grid, I wanted to make some points about the numbers themselves.

The four corners have simple 7×7 tables within them with either the numbers 1-7 or 2-8 in rows; two of each appear in opposing corners. Thus the sum of each row is either 28 or 35, meaning that two sum to 196 and two sum to 245; each pair sums to 441 (21^2), a number I’ve dealt with at length before. The digits begin in ascending order and from there shift over one spot, meaning that the number 1 for the 1-7 table and the number 2 for the 2-8 table is in a diagonal. The one exception is the lower-right corner which has the top of the table with the numbers 1-7 in reverse order at the top. Interestingly, if one chose to view the reversal as a reason to subtract that table from its lower-left counterpart, one would naturally get a difference of 49.

The lower-right corner is another clue, namely the general area that also number 49: column 32 of the grid within the circle (not including the ring of numbers itself–which sums to 272 (16*17–not part of a Pythagorean triple, sadly!). The circle itself, I should note, has exactly 111 letters within it, 111 being the number of God and the Gematria value of the Hebrew letter Aleph when spelled out (the Aleph as a letter alone is worth 1), and the ring is composed of 56 (7*8) numbers.

Interestingly, columns 30-32 break the inner pattern of the circle in many ways. Columns 18-20 (rows 18-20 & 30-32) have two length-3 sides adjoined by 90 degrees with a repeating number: the number 6 in the upper-left and the number 2 in the lower-left. For the counterpart in the upper right, a 4-4-4 column meets a 3-3-3 row due to a break in the normal pattern. The lower-right is even “curiouser”: the numbers make a 5-5-5 column, the topmost 5 of which begins a 5-6-5 row. Intrigued, I decided to sum these numbers by column and by row, and the number 6 produced a column sum (excluding the ring of the circle) of 50, while its neighbor which (which ends the row) yielded a column sum of 49. See the screenshot:

Columns 31 & 32 of Leaf 9a, within the circle

Fifty is a Kabbalistically significant number (associated with Binah and the letter Nun, among other things), and 49, of course, relates once more to both the Heptarchy and the dimensionality of Loagaeth. Of interest to me is that is these positions, columns 31 & 32, refer via addition to 63, or 7*9; multiplying by 7 (the basis of much of Enochian) yields 441 once again. the number of the row is 30, referring to the number of Aethyrs.

So, having seen this pattern here, another possible means to solve Loagaeth is to look to Columns 32 (the 6th & 7th from the middle row) and possibly also Row 30; or just cells R30C31 and R30C32 (to use MS Excel notation), across the tables. It’s possible a pattern (such as an Enochian phrase providing another clue) can arise in this manner. I haven’t yet explored it, but I will!