A Solution to Liber Loagaeth, Part 7

So I got to the “Pagesgem” half-leaf (9a) a few days ago. Aside from it being beautiful and the only table to both have numbers and a name, Bornogo, from the Heptarchy (four times in a beautiful cross-and-X pattern), and being the only table to have a large circle of diameter 21 within the grid, I wanted to make some points about the numbers themselves.

The four corners have simple 7×7 tables within them with either the numbers 1-7 or 2-8 in rows; two of each appear in opposing corners. Thus the sum of each row is either 28 or 35, meaning that two sum to 196 and two sum to 245; each pair sums to 441 (21^2), a number I’ve dealt with at length before. The digits begin in ascending order and from there shift over one spot, meaning that the number 1 for the 1-7 table and the number 2 for the 2-8 table is in a diagonal. The one exception is the lower-right corner which has the top of the table with the numbers 1-7 in reverse order at the top. Interestingly, if one chose to view the reversal as a reason to subtract that table from its lower-left counterpart, one would naturally get a difference of 49.

The lower-right corner is another clue, namely the general area that also number 49: column 32 of the grid within the circle (not including the ring of numbers itself–which sums to 272 (16*17–not part of a Pythagorean triple, sadly!). The circle itself, I should note, has exactly 111 letters within it, 111 being the number of God and the Gematria value of the Hebrew letter Aleph when spelled out (the Aleph as a letter alone is worth 1), and the ring is composed of 56 (7*8) numbers.

Interestingly, columns 30-32 break the inner pattern of the circle in many ways. Columns 18-20 (rows 18-20 & 30-32) have two length-3 sides adjoined by 90 degrees with a repeating number: the number 6 in the upper-left and the number 2 in the lower-left. For the counterpart in the upper right, a 4-4-4 column meets a 3-3-3 row due to a break in the normal pattern. The lower-right is even “curiouser”: the numbers make a 5-5-5 column, the topmost 5 of which begins a 5-6-5 row. Intrigued, I decided to sum these numbers by column and by row, and the number 6 produced a column sum (excluding the ring of the circle) of 50, while its neighbor which (which ends the row) yielded a column sum of 49. See the screenshot:

Columns 31 & 32 of Leaf 9a, within the circle

Fifty is a Kabbalistically significant number (associated with Binah and the letter Nun, among other things), and 49, of course, relates once more to both the Heptarchy and the dimensionality of Loagaeth. Of interest to me is that is these positions, columns 31 & 32, refer via addition to 63, or 7*9; multiplying by 7 (the basis of much of Enochian) yields 441 once again. the number of the row is 30, referring to the number of Aethyrs.

So, having seen this pattern here, another possible means to solve Loagaeth is to look to Columns 32 (the 6th & 7th from the middle row) and possibly also Row 30; or just cells R30C31 and R30C32 (to use MS Excel notation), across the tables. It’s possible a pattern (such as an Enochian phrase providing another clue) can arise in this manner. I haven’t yet explored it, but I will!

Starting Gebofal: copying Liber Loagaeth

So I haven’t been posting as much of late because I decided to take the plunge and start copying Liber Loagaeth, the holy book of God’s speech (“Loagaeth” being the Enochian word for God’s speech). This is intricate and deliberate work, in which the supplicant/aspirant slowly copies tables of letters to paper. Moreover, the letters must be transliterated from English to Enochian, and furthermore must be reversed from left-to-right to right-to-left (Enochian being the mythical forerunner to Hebrew).

This is a very time-consuming task, for the tables are 49×49, meaning each side of the page has 2,401 letters. Poor John Dee & Edward Kelley were to get the whole thing done in a few months, and they missed their deadline. I started August 11th (but began studying this in early July, when Mars had barely been in my ninth house) and have only completed two of the 49 “leaves” (front and back) of the book.

This was the third of the major components of the Enochian system (the other two being the heptarchical & watchtower/elemental systems), and “the measure” of the other two (i.e., the other two were not as vast). The task of gebofal (or at least of copying Liber Loagaeth) preceded the revelation of the Enochian calls, and for that reason I have decided to take it on. I suspect, though I cannot yet prove, that this part of the system opens one up to revelations like the calls, and moreover that this revelation is unique to each individual. I haven’t quizzed another who has done this task, so if it’s something you’ve already done, let me know. Regardless, it would be of interest to have multiple means of contacting the divine, so that if the Aethyrs or the calls do not resonate, another means can become available. Perhaps I’m too naive on the subject to say for sure.

A couple of further notes. This task is reminiscent of the paradigm of medieval scholars, who took the view that the ancient knowledge has become corrupted and that we humans must try to recover it as best we can. Surely this is the case when I am working off of old copies of difficult-to-read scans! I have found three and am trying to reconcile them. Two come from Ceremonial Magick Musings: Dee’s original (Sloane MS 3188–though Ashmole’s copy, Sloane 3189, is also there), a third copy (Sloane 2599). The fourth is a PDF version from AOM. The full tables are easier to read in 2599, but there are still smudges in there (though not as bad as the frequent fading in the Dee/Kelley copy). Having started, I keep on finding errors, including the handwritten first leaf taken down by Dee not quite matching the individual letters he’s previously recorded (Dee himself notes this and I literally only had to read the previous page and take down the letters individually pronounced by the angel—oops!). Even my copy will have mistakes, I’m sure. So, I decided to use white-out along the way because, hey, I’m human, and this will be a human product, even if originating from the divine.

Another thing I’ve noticed is that I’m having internal subtle body unlockings; the energy flows more freely and blissfully: a divine feeling indeed. This task reminds me of The Magicians; SPOILER:

Penny loses his hands and is given a new pair, but can’t cast with them, so he turns to a professor, who agrees to fix them in exchange for Penny doing manual tasks, including untying a massive knot of ropes the go to the ceiling, and turning a huge table into sawdust using only a simple file. On the show, the goal was to unlock magic stored within those objects; in this case, I believe there is subtle energy unlocked by A) humbling oneself to do what seems to be a tedious task, and B) there is magick in the words that make up Loagaeth itself. To that end, I try to pronounce the words mentally as I go, and when I come to the 49-day task, I intend to recite/vibrate the text book aloud. Leitch has instructions on his website, which I’m not linking to because I suspect it’s going into a second edition of his Enochian Grimoire.

I’ll keep you posted; in the meantime, here are the half-leaves I’ve finished (1A still needs correction). Note that 1A and most of 1B are actually several pages of just handwritten text (not actually a table), so they don’t conform to the single-page format.












How to Progress through Enochian

Enochian is, to be clear, fairly advanced, but it need not be unapproachable. Even someone just exploring magick can get a benefit from exposure to Enochian (this is why I have taught Enochian classes before at Unlimited Thought, so people of all ability levels can see that Enochian needn’t be held in an arcane tower).

Where to begin? I recommend going to a live or virtual class held by someone who has worked with Enochian before (these are the days of Covid-19, so virtual is preferred). A TEX scrying should probably be on the agenda, because this starts evolving your consciousness to work in the celestial realm. Next, I recommend Lon Milo DuQuette‘s book Enochian Vision Magick. It’s simple, straightforward, and to the point of getting you understanding the systems and starting to work with it. You can begin with printed or hand-made versions of all the materials on paper.

The next steps depend on your preferences, so I’ll list them in no particular order. Jason Louv has the definitive history of the system, and this contextualizes things like its apocalyptic imagery. Scott Stenwick has excellent books on the Heptarchical system as well as the Elemental system; the latter, the book on the watchtowers, informs you how to work the watchtower kinds, seniors, kerubs, and “lesser” angels (only “lesser” by comparison!). Moreover, Aaron Leitch has released a first and second volume on the Enochian language.

Last, I will recommend Aaron Leitch’s Enochian Grimoire for the use of gebofal in magick. The rest of the grimoire is a fine introduction and covers most of the topics above, but I just didn’t use it, so I cannot review the book in its entirety. I would note the strongly Renaissance feel of his treatment of the material (to be expected, given Enochian’s origins), which unfortunately includes the high volume of magickal equipment to be used. Still, gebofal is next on my list of Enochian magick to work through, and I know of no other writer who has offered writing on it, and Leitch’s instructions on it are straightforward.

Enjoy!