A More Universal Grounding Meditation: Heart of the Root Chakra Technique

It occurred to me that with things kind of feeling wobbly within my circle of friends, it might help to have a more advanced grounding meditation. The truth is, no matter how much we ground in the present moment, there’s always going to be a bit of precariousness to the security we feel within that present moment. Moments feed into other moments, and the only constant is change.

What that means for us is that we need a different way to feel stable, and the work to be done is more of a heart-level. Yet we still ultimately want security, so this fundamentally seems more like a root chakra matter. So, combining these two ideas, one technique you might try is visualizing each of your chakras as having seven sub-chakras within them: crown of the crown, third eye of the crown, etc., all the way to the root of the root. Of these 49 sub-chakras, focus on the heart of the root chakra. Imagine it relaxing and feeling softer, and you can come to realize that kindness, acceptance, and openness to the world in all of its odd changes is a foundation (root) for security can be helpful to you, just as focusing on the basics. Of course, do these in the right order: food should be the number one priority if you’re starving! But over the long term, ignoring one’s heart when it comes to security will be unsatisfactory and leave a nagging feeling that some security is missing, which will never be filled with more things.

Video on this technique is here. Enjoy!

Basic Grounding Meditation

I often refer to the basics of spiritual practices, and one of these is a basic grounding meditation. There’s not much to it, but it’s important for intermediate and advanced practitioners to remember to return to the present moment, one’s present body, and one’s immediate environment. It’s also good to remember that “heaven” (psyche, soul, etc.) is always intimately linked with earth, just as samsara is to nirvana. The practice of grounding one’s awareness should not be overlooked.

To give an idea of what grounding looks like, I have created a basic grounding meditation on YouTube here. Enjoy, and good luck!

Three common problems with online designs of the SDA

I mentioned this on the Praxis Behind the Obscure podcast, but it deserves attention for those of you who may be making you own Sigillum Dei Aemeth. Some of the online designs are incorrect.

The first and probably most important issue is the inclusion of the y/14 cell at the bottom of the outer ring. This is probably most problematic because not only did the Archangel Michael directly tell Dee elsewhere in the diaries to fix it, but also because this causes the sum of the outer ring plus one (which was to be added as directed by Michael) to add up to 440, not 441. 441 is equivalent to the word “Aemeth” or “truth,” while 440 is equivalent to “dead.”

The next problem is that the angel name Ized is sometimes listed as Izad. Review DuQuette’s Enochian Vision Magick to see how the angel names are derived from the associated table.

Finally, the letter Z to the left of the top of the pentagram should actually be an S, for the same reason as mentioned above. Dee apparently replaced the S with a Z based on phonetics, something he did elsewhere at least marginally at one point in his diaries.

Have I mentioned how indebted I am to the Phergoph site? You should check it out.

Overview Video & Enochian Working: Zodiacal Table & Lamen

I received the zodiacal lamen I ordered today, and took the rest of the day off to get started working with it. Some quick observations:

  1. The energy of the zodiacal table & lamen is subtler and more ethereal.
  2. I recommend saying the names of the letters around the zodiacal table 12 times each, not 7.
  3. I made a little video explaining the table and lamen and its uses.

Enjoy!

Bridging Buddhism and Enochian, Part 6: Considering the Pure Lands

Before I get into my analysis of the Pure Lands, let me note how this is related to Enochian in my mind. Mainly, the concept of Pure Lands remind me of the Enochian word pibliar, which means “places of comfort.” Pibliar itself is striking to me, for why have such a different word for heaven, unless it is not about heaven? Pibliar appears in the seventh spoken Enochian call, the translation of which is quite lovely:

“The east is a house of virgins singing praises amongst the flames of the First Glory; wherein the Lord hath opened His Mouth, and they become 28 living dwellings in whom the strength of men rejoiceth and they are appareled with ornaments of brightness such as work wonders on all creatures. Whose kingdoms and continuance are as the Third and Fourth; strong towers and places of comfort, the seats of mercy and continuance. O you servants of mercy, move, appear, sing praises unto the Creator, and be mighty amongst us. For to this remembrance is given power and our strength waxeth strong in our Comforter.”

I’ll digress to note the here the astrological, kabbalistic, and numerological implications: there’s a clear reference to the 28 lunar mansions (“28 living dwellings…appareled with ornaments of brightness [stars]”), and the implication of the moon (“waxeth”). The ordering of the dyads would suggest that the Third or the number 3 relates to strong towers, a seat of mercy, while the Fourth or the number 4 suggests places of comfort and a seat of continuance–but a clear reading of the text suggests a switch of significations, which should instead be as follows: 3, strong towers, a seat of continuance; and 4, places of comfort, seat of mercy. This corresponds well with 3 as Binah/Understanding and 4/Chesed/Mercy.

As I mentioned: I digress. To the analysis: in Buddhism, pure lands or buddha-fields are reminiscent of an actual location or place. Indeed, the Buddha Amitabha’s pure land of Sukhavati is described as millions of Buddha lands to the west, whereas other Buddhas’ pure lands also have directions: Aksobhya’s pure land of Abhirati to the east, Ratnasambhava’s pure land of Srimat to the south, and Amoghasiddhi’s pure land of Karmaprasiddhi/Prakuta of the north. Vairocana hosts Akanistha-Ghanavyuha. Note that “millions of Buddha lands to the west” (I’ve read in some sources “west of earth”) suggests a continuum of what is extruded out–presumably from Earth–and that this itself is reminiscent of both the celestial sphere of astrology, but also the Sambhogakaya or “body of enjoyment.”

Thus, we have the Earth (or other physical worlds) as the place of the actual bodies of Buddhas, or Nirmanakayas, the extrusion or reflection of these into Sambhogakayas and perhaps a similar extrusion of pure lands (which resemble metaphorical “fixed stars” mentioned by my friend Cody P.), and finally a Dharmakaya, which is an inconceivable aspect of being a Buddha. This makes the physical world very important, for we have a means of experiencing or even integrating all pure lands at once. To that end, as practitioners, it may be worthwhile to not only attempt to travel or project astrally to a pure land, but also to consider using the technique (from what I loosely “Hermetic Kabbalah”) of pathworking (i.e., finding paths from one Pure Land to another). The latter will likely help the seeker discover more about their own particular set of “fixed stars” which could guide and inform the particular Sambhogakaya they can develop.

Relating the Dharmakaya to Enochian, it reminds me of the phrase from Hermeticism (specifically Book of the 24 Philosophers) which I found referenced here: “God is an infinite sphere, the center of which is everywhere, the circumference nowhere.” To that I’ll add that for me, the Divine must also have the Buddha nature.

Bridging Buddhism and Enochian, Part 5: The Matter of Error

There’s a lot of unspoken tropes in culture in the U.S. (where I live), but they are apparent with even the simplest of analysis. Good vs. Evil, right vs. wrong, inclusion vs. exclusion, collective vs. the individual. Americans tend to polarize these into simplistic terms, and one must remember that we have sophisticated minds which can interpret these along a continuum. Nonetheless, so much hinges on correct understanding of the terms, or we may find our narratives lost; finding this correct understanding, we can begin to operate from Wisdom.

I’ve been binging and re-binging Buddhist lectures and trying to make sense of what I learn. One term that I wanted to linger on for this post was the concept of “wrong view.” It’s a term that is used in Buddhism to suggest that, “Hey, your perspective here is what’s going to cause problems,” and these problems include how one lives one’s life, how well one will progress in one’s practice, and the like. That word “wrong” doesn’t carry with it moral implications in the sense of a root evil. Instead, it’s simply not correct: a mistake.

I’ve been reflecting about how Christianity hinges on sin, which is so intimately connected in Christian thinking to evil. Really, I’ve come to think of this view as mistaken. Sin really means “mistake.” We all make mistakes, and usually it’s some incorrect perspective that has caused us to make mistakes. Of course, sometimes these mistakes will work against our own best interests, or against animals, or against another person, or against nature.

At the same time, it’s important to realize that mistakes are part of ourselves, part of nature, part of our orientation towards others. For this reason, mistakenness and sin are normal. We live with a steady difference between who we are and what we do in the moment compared to who we realize ourselves to be later. This difference, and the discovery of our mistakes, is part of life. I do not consider this to be evil at all. It is actually quite good, for it allows growth. I also consider this tendency to be part of the Divine; it is this Heart which is reflected out, so that the Divine may grow, also. So, we should accept and welcome our failings, while of course steadily working and probing ways to rectify, within ourselves and with each other, to allow for better growth with time.

Once this attitude shift takes place, Christianity and Buddhism will be speaking much more of the same language.